Trentino Alto Adige Italy 10 Fun Facts - Digging Up Roots in the Boot

Trentino Alto Adige Italy 10 Fun Facts

Ciao tutti! Welcome to The Best of Italy, a video series on Digging up Roots on the Boot’s YouTube Channel.  Alessia is going to share 10 fun facts about Trentino Alto Adige, Italy.  It is one of 20 Italian Regions in Northern Italy.  Watch the video and continue reading below. Also, be sure and subscribe to our YouTube channel so you don’t miss out on new video posts.

1Trentino Alto Adige - The Struggle

Trentino Alto Adige became part of Italy in 1919 after the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian war.  At that time, Mussolini forced a program of Italianization on the German people.  Then, in 1938, Hitler and Mussolini agreed to transfer the German-speaking population to German-ruled territory. 

With great difficulty, after the end of the second world war, many who were displaced returned to their ancestral land.  Today, the official languages are Italian and German.  Also, the region is divided into two autonomous provinces, Trento and Bolzano.

2 Trento aka Trentino

The first autonomous province of Trento is also known as Trentino.  It is divided into 16 districts with 217 small towns.  Italy’s second-largest river, the Adige, flows through central Trentino. 

About 96% of the population speaks Italian.  In addition, there are three indigenous linguistic minorities.  They are protected by regional and provincial laws. 

First, Ladin is a romance language that is a mix of dialects mainly spoken in the Dolomites.

 Second, Mòcheno is closely related to Bavarian and spoken in three towns in Bernstol. 

Third, Cimbrian is a Germanic language that probably comes from a Southern Bavarian dialect.  It is considered an endangered language because of the number of speakers shifting to the Italian language. 

3 Melinda in Trentino Alto Adige

Val di Non has been cultivating apples for over 2000 years.  In fact, the microclimate produces the majority of Italy’s apples.  The valley fruit growers work as a cooperative under the trademark Melinda.  It is a combination of two words.  Mela is apple, and linda which means clean.  Undoubtedly, they pride themselves on clean growing techniques, quality control, and packaging.

4 Sports in Trento Alto Adige

Madonna di Campiglio is a small village and one of Italy’s most fashionable ski resorts.  It regularly hosts World Cup alpine skiing and snowboarding races in the winter.  Whereas, during the summer it hosts Rally Stella Alpina, a vintage motorsport race. 

5 A Small Town in Trentino Alto Adige

Fiera di Primiero, in the heart of the Dolomites, is the second smallest town in Italy.  Incredibly, It is only 0.15 square kilometers with a population of about 500.  It is a typical example of a historic Tyrol village.  Also, It is a popular. year-round tourist destination

6 Bolzano aka Südtirol

Bolzano is also known as Südtirol or South Tyrol in English.  It is the second autonomous region of Trentino Alto Adige. It should be noted that It is the northernmost province in Italy and located entirely in the Alps.  It is a multilingual region like Trentino.  In fact, the three main official languages are German, Italian, and Ladin. 

Today, the majority of the population speaks German and less than 25% speak Italian.   There are only eight villages that speak Ladin. Altogether, about 75% of Italian speakers live in the capital of Bolzano. 

7 Free University of Bozen-Bolzano

The Free University of Bozen-Bolzano is a multilingual university that offers most of its Lectures and seminars in German, Italian, and English.  They have campuses at Bolzano, Brixen and Bruneck.  Additionally,  The University library is one of the best amongst German-speaking Sates. 

8 Innovation in Trentino Alto Adige

Research is a large focus in Bolzano. The Nature of Innovation is a Techpark in south Bolzano. Its concept is Innovation imitating nature. They focus on Renewable Energies and food technology among other things. 

Eurac Research is a private research facility that focuses on topics such as Diversity as Added Value and a Healthy Society in the Alpine region. 

On the other hand, Fraunhofer Italia focuses on helping small and mid-size engineering businesses in the region with research. 

9 Traditional Costumes of Trentino Alto Adige

The Dirndl is a traditional feminine dress worn in South Tyrol.   It is typical of traditional peasant clothes from the Alps.  There used to be distinct styles for each region, but today they are more universal. 

Tracht is a traditional costume that is still occasionally worn at weddings.  Displaced Germans often organized events to wear Tracht to feel a sense of unity. 

Lederhosen are short leather pants.  Originally, they were common work clothes for men. However, now they are considered folk costumes in South Tyrol. 

10 Egetmann Carnival

Every odd-numbered year since 1591 the town of Termeno hosts a Carnival Parade called Egetmann.  It takes months to prepare for and, according to a very old local custom, only men can participate.  The men dress in costumes and humorously reenact a peasant wedding.

It is a strange interactive parade that you can join in on if you like.  Also, In even years there is a children’s version of the parade that both boys and girls take part in. 

Do you know any other fun facts about Trentino Alto Adige?  Let’s talk it out in the comment section below. Also, be sure and watch our other fun fact videos on Italy’s 20 regions and read our blog posts on Italy’s 20 regions. Thanks for watching and reading 10 fun facts about Trentino Alto Adige. A presto!

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LauraLee

I am a proud third generation Italian American dedicated to promoting the richness of Italian cultural heritage.

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