5 Key Criteria for Italian Citizenship “Jure Sanguinis”

Italian citizenship-5 key criteria for Italian Citizenship

Are you interested in discovering your eligibility for “jure sanguinis” (blood right)?  Not every Italian descendant is eligible to have their dual citizenship recognized.  First, you must meet a set of key criteria for Italian citizenship.  This post is a follow-up to last week’s post; 7 Reasons Italian Citizenship Can Change Your Life.  Here you can find a list of 5 key criteria for Italian citizenship. Get started now and see if you qualify.  Before March 17, 1861, there was no #Italy. So, there were no Italian citizens. Click To Tweet

Italian citizenship was exclusive until August 15, 1992.

Italian citizens who voluntarily naturalized in another country automatically renounced their Italian citizenship.

Children born to Italian citizens in a country with “sure solis*” acquired their foreign citizenships involuntarily because of their birthplace.

*meaning ‘right of the soil’, is a rule that the citizenship of a child is determined by the place of its birth. It is the predominant practice in the Americas but is rare elsewhere.

These children can claim Italian citizenship if they can prove that their Italian-born descendant was an Italian citizen at the time of their births.

They can pass Italian citizenship to their children, grandchildren and so on.

5 Key Criteria for Italian Citizenship

5 Key criteria for Italian citizenship 1. The Unification of Italy

Before March 17, 1861, Italy was not a unified country. Before this date, there was no Italy.  So, there were no Italian citizens.

  • To qualify, the Italian ancestor in your bloodline must have been alive on or after this date.

2. The 1912 Rule

Italian citizens naturalized before July 1, 1912, cannot transmit Italian citizenship to their children regardless of when they were born.

There are exceptions to the 1912 rule.

  • The child must not have been a minor at the time of naturalization.

The child’s Italian citizenship could survive the parents’ loss of citizenship.   It survived the loss if he or she reached legal adulthood before the parent’s naturalization. That is age 21 before 10 March 1975 and age 18 after that.

  • The child was a resident in Italy when the father naturalized.

3. The 1948 Rule*

A person born before January 1, 1948, can claim Italian citizenship.  They do this only through their father.

  • The father was not a naturalized citizen of another country before his child’s birth.
  • A woman can transfer citizenship only to her children born after January 1, 1948.
  • The mother was not a naturalized citizen of another country before her child’s birth.

*If this is the only obstruction to your eligibility, you may still have your citizenship recognized. You can have your application reviewed by the courts in Italy.  Some people have successfully challenged this rule in the Italian courts.

4. Naturalization & Renounced Italian citizenship

  • Your Italian ancestor must not have naturalized before the birth of his/her descendant. This includes you and any of the ascendants in your direct line born before August 15, 1992.

5. Veneto, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia & Trentino Alto Adige

  • If your Italian ancestor was born in Veneto, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia, or Trentino Alto Adige, you are required to show proof that he or she left Italy after July 16, 1920.

5 key criteria for Italian citizenship

Determining the key criteria for Italian citizenship “jure sanguinis” is not always cut and dry. Keep the following in mind:

  •  Every person in your direct bloodline must meet all conditions listed above.
  • There is no generational limit, except in respect to the date of 17 March 1861.

These 5 key criteria for Italian citizenship are intended to be a starting point.

Contact us to find out more about our Italian citizenship consultation services and how we can help you.

Have you had your Italian citizenship recognized? What difficulties did you have to overcome along the way?

*Affiliate LinkGrammarly

Please Share!

LauraLee

I am a proud third generation Italian American dedicated to promoting the richness of Italian cultural heritage.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

Leave a Comment:

Our FREE Guide


Download this easy guide to start digging up YOUR Roots in the Boot!

x

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close